Why I Lack Enthusiasm for the Church

22 reasons.

It is 11 am on a Sunday morning. 3 minutes late, as usual, I slip into a middle-back pew and finger my keys restlessly. Did I really need to dress up before noon on a weekend?

I’m a college-educated young professional. I love Christ, but sometimes I feel badly because I’m not so excited about His church. I scan the congregants. As usual, mostly senior citizens and a few young families. A few sullen-looking teenagers. These people don’t know me, I think regretfully. They’ll never get me. Does God really need me here?

59 minutes later, we are all out the door. I am thinking the same thing I think most weeks – really, I didn’t get much from that. The awareness that my deepest moments of worship will come this afternoon, on a training run in breezy sunshine with my iPod and audio Bible, nags me.     

I find in the gospels (Matthew 16:18) that the gates of hell will never overcome the church of Christ. This excites me, because I do not have this guarantee for any other entity in my life. I don’t want to resent the church. I’m trying to get excited about it – I’ve been trying for years – but excitement is slow in coming.

In Christian periodicals I notice an influx of diagnostic books, authored mostly by middle-aged stalwarts, on my generation and church. Where are the young adults? Where have they gone? How can we bring them back?

It’s true: my generation, the Millenials, aren’t in church for the most part. Why the lack of enthusiasm? If you were to ask me, I’d take a deep breath and reply something like this:

  • Because my soul cries for a huddle during half time or a war-time briefing from the Commander, yet church feels more like a retirement home social club.
  • Because all or most of the spiritual breakthroughs in my life have happened, not because of the church, but almost in spite of it.
  • Because something in me knows that if Christianity is true, it is the most radical and the most demanding thing in the whole world. But attending church is the easiest thing I do all week. Shouldn’t it be the most intellectually challenging, the most emotionally honest, and the most spiritually enriching activity of my week? I’m not saying I want this from church, but something tells me I need it.
  • Because though I hunger for community and acknowledge my need for accountability, I can find or create this apart from the church and the rationale for formal church membership has never been explained to me.
  • Because I long to worship, but in church I hardly know how – I feel closest to my God when I am tired or needy or exuberant or thoughtful, in the forge of my everyday life.
  • Because I long to connect with the Creator of heaven & earth, but they do not pray in church with this awe, and so secretly I wonder if they mean it.
  • Because the people who teach me and who ask me hard questions and who I want to live like and learn from are outside of my church.
  • Because they thought the music was becoming more hip, but I noticed that in any other context the lyrics would have been taken for an adolescent love song – infatuated without explanation, repetitive, simplistic, and whiny. I wanted lyrics that would challenge me and confuse me and teach me and catch me up in the grandeur of Almighty God.
  • Because they do everything for me – I sing songs from the screen and I can even read the sermon from the screen and I stopped bringing my Bible because I didn’t even need it. If I wanted to be entertained I would have gone to a concert, and if I wanted a detached lecture, I could have stayed at school.
  • Because the sermons and the doctrine didn’t so much make me think as they fed me other people’s thoughts.
  • Because though I have a warm respect for the pastor, I do not want to be like him when I ‘grow up,’ and I would not want his marriage or his perspective or his demeanor.
  • Because I know God said that those who know Him best plead the cause of the poor, deliver the afflicted, and defend the helpless (Jeremiah 22:16), but the people who lead in these efforts in my community and around the world are generally not triumphed, not supported, and not a priority in my church experience.
  • Because though the majority of my Sunday school teachers and the church leaders and church members are precious senior citizens, their children and grandchildren seem to have gone missing along the way. I wonder where they are and what they saw that made them leave and why I should be expected to return before they do. And I wonder why I am the project and the prodigal and the lost sheep while they are never mentioned.
  • Because the church talks about people who are “called into the ministry” or “called to preach” and asks me to support them, but my Bible says that everyone is called.
  • Because I met, or perceived – rightly or wrongly – more hypocrites in the church than I sensed anywhere else.
  • Because, everywhere else in life, if I want something, I am told how to get it, but in church, if I want something – to be married or to know the Lord’s will or to find the right job, for instance – I am told to wait on the Lord instead of being given an instruction manual. Surely Christianity is nothing, if it is not fiercely practical?
  • Because everything is cloaked in platitudes. I hate platitudes. Although yes, I speak in them too. But I wish I didn’t.
  • Because my parents were not enthusiastic about the church.
  • Because my hard and frank questions are not answered with equal hardness and frankness.
  • Because I am not expected to contribute to the intellectual climate of the church community, and I am not expected to work hard at the practical things, although being young and available I am the most able to work hard and being hungry intellectually I also have the most need to contribute.
  • Because being a ‘missionary’ means going to Africa or South America forever, but few mention that my school and my workplace and my city need missionaries, too.
  • Because no one has ever asked me to be, no one expects me to be, and if I were, everyone would be surprised.

This post was originally published July 18 2013. [/sociallocker]

41 Comments

  • July 11, 2013

    Kristen

    Love this. This is great. You make very good points. The only point I have a little bit of pushback on is the idea that church should be fiercely practical. I do think the faith helps us navigate our lives in practical ways but I also think part of the problem with church in the recent past is we make Jesus a means to an end – for example, if I do x, y, and z, for Jesus, then He will bring me a husband. When he doesn’t, we grow disillusioned. Jesus cannot be a means to various ends, but He needs to be the end itself. And yes, sometimes in life we do just need to wait. We can’t always fix. We must trust, pray, and wait on the Lord. That of course doesn’t mean we are to be passive people. But when we look for a practical manual for everything, we lose out on the mystery of God and forego an unfolding relationship with Him, which means listening to His voice over the course of our lives. Anyway, just a thought. Overall, thought this was really helpful and I resonate with a lot of it. (I am a woman pastor in my late 30s).

  • July 11, 2013

    Rae Gonsalves

    Why are you waiting to be asked? If you see a need, why not offer to fill it? We, as the members, are there to serve, and through our service we are served or better, filled.

    While I am a 40 something person, when I look back at my church through my life, I would have said the same things about my church at your age. I suggest you find something at your church (or ANY church) that you are passionate about and serve. That brings fellowship and builds relationships.

    I encourage you NOT to give up on church.

  • July 11, 2013

    Scott

    This comment is truly written in love (that’s my preface)…

    1) You’re so right on so many levels. The local church is one of the most dysfunctional and unexciting places on the planet when it ought to be one of the most exciting and effectual organizations.

    2) My biggest concern about your reasoning for why you lack enthusiasm for the church is that you’ve missed entirely the point of being a part of the local church in the first place. Which, to be fair, you admitted that formal church membership was never really explained to you. Church membership is a covenantal relationship. Meaning YOU commit to doing and being certain things, regardless of what the other party does or doesn’t do. Just as in a marriage, a man and a woman agree to love through any circumstance, when you join the local church, you commit to doing and being certain things. For example, when you become a part of the local church, you commit to serving one another. Others in the church may or may not serve you in your time of need (as they should), but in THEIR time of need–how do you respond? I guess I’d summarize it this way… you get out of the local church what you put into it, and it only becomes a place that excites you when you do all you can to make it that kind of place.

    If a local church stops preaching the Gospel or starts getting soft on sin, it’s probably worth leaving. Otherwise, put roots in where you’re planted and MAKE it the most exciting place for you to invest your time, whether others help you in this journey or not. After all, your relationship with the local church ought not be contractual: (i.e. IF you make this worship service exciting, I will give to the church) but rather covenantal (i.e. I vow to love and serve the community at First Church regardless of the fact that you made me endure “Shout to the Lord” three Sundays in a row).

    Just my thoughts…

    P.S. A wonderful sermon series on this topic can be found at http://www.thevillagechurch.net/resources/sermons/#series-sort_the-dearest-place-on-earth

  • July 11, 2013

    Sarah Caldwell

    I’m 58 and this has been pretty much true for 45 years, but I’m still there almost every week because sometimes what I get out of church is that I was there to find someone to encourage (or provoke). The fact that I love the old hymns and we sing them more than the theologically empty praise songs you mention is a plus, but you can get on the worship committee and push for that.

  • July 11, 2013

    Reinaldo Medina

    Why do I feel like you? Great article!

  • July 11, 2013

    mallprophet

    Reblogged this on Mallprophet’s Weblog.

  • July 11, 2013

    David Dewey

    Amen Sister Sarah C., ‘Empty Praise songs” I dislike them too–simplistic in words & music, not awe inspiring nor often even with good theology in them (“Only he is worthy” Uh, I thought the message was “We are ALL worthy”).
    And I agree with the author–I do not go to church to be entertained, although when one is in front of the congregation, there is a certain amount of theatre involved (Hey, my (now former) job was a Performing Arts Center Tech director, so I know the importance of Stage Presence).

  • July 11, 2013

    kpimblott

    You should do what we did and start your own. Love

  • July 11, 2013

    Jethro

    To slack to give you a real response. Too moved to not write anything.
    “Be the change you want to see in the world” – Ghandi??
    Just change the word world to church.
    Respect that you shared these feelings though. My concern is that ‘is blogging your serious attempt at reaching out for answers’?

  • July 12, 2013

    T Chan

    Dear Sarah, if as a young 24 year old professional you have twenty-two reasons why the local church isn’t doing it for you, I assure your the list will only grow as you age. I grew up in the church, met my wife in the church, raised three children in the church (one of who is almost your age). I have have served in the full spectrum of ministries spanning from small groups to deacon/ elder roles, and even as an interim pastor when the one we had resigned. I can give you forty-four or even eighty-eight personal reasons why I should have left the church or recall when it has let me down or threw me under the bus. Just about anything that can happen outside of the church I have seen happen inside of the church. Hypocrites? They are around every Sunday. I have been teaching some of the kids for the better part of 13 years and at times wonder if it made any difference.

    Like you, I have wondered why do I still go on more than one or two Sundays mornings, or Friday nights. Despite all the things that should have killed my enthusiasm for the church, I still love the church. I suggest to you that the root issue is not what you perceive about the church is killing your enthusiasm but do you have the right reasons to LOVE the church. The key to loving the church is found in understanding what Jesus said about the church and how you and I must bring our thoughts inline with His Words.

    First and foremost, let no one forget or diminish the fact that Jesus gave His life for the church. Let that thought sink in and soak in. Did Jesus gave his life for a building? Programs? Sunday school curriculums? Stuffy sermons? NO! He gave His life for his people. We who are saved but are still living in the flesh. We are the church. No Christian can speak about the church without speaking also about him or herself. The church Paul wrote about in 1 Corinthians was a three ring circus yet Paul gave thanks and praise to Jesus for them! They tried to toss Paul out yet he still loved them like his own children. For this reason, he firmly and lovingly brought the Scriptures to bear on the problems of the people to sanctify them.

    The next time you are sitting in the pew, look around and say to yourself as your eyes land on each person,” Jesus went to the cross for his or her sins, brokenness, and failures like He did for me.” This truth should humble your heart and kill your pride. Imagine God sent you a list of twenty-two reasons why if not for His grace you would not have your name in the Book of Life? How about forty-four or eighty-eight? That’s what I do whenever I begin to think how certain people around me are living an inferior Christian life. Believe me, it works.

    The church is made up of saved sinners who are responding to the command of Jesus Christ to meet together as a distinct community called out from the world from which they were once enslaved to. The church is a gift from the Father to the Son. We are the Bride of Christ. Jesus promised He will build His church and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. This is what God thinks about us, the church. What then should our thoughts be?

    We are called to be brothers and sisters and frankly we affirm this by treating each other like such for better or worse. I recognize that. But we have a common Father in heaven and in Him we all share in the same inheritance.

    Sarah, God saved you to be part of His community so that you can bless, build, love, laugh, and cry over it in a way that only you can. If not for the Holy Spirit, the Christian church should have died off for all the reasons that you listed. Remember that church is just a taste of Heaven. The real deal is yet to come.

    Blessings.

  • July 12, 2013

    Shelly

    I am a 20-something woman, and I understand what you are saying. I was there a few years ago, disconnected, and not getting a lot out of going to church.

    But church is about relationship, and it sounds like you haven’t formed any in this church. That might be your first step. It was my first step. Be part of a small group and get to know people within your church. Then maybe the people asking you hard questions and ministering to your heart would be in the church, because they would know you and you would have a relationship where they could be that person. Because that isn’t going to come without a relationship.

    And also consider that it’s not about where you want to/decide to attend church, but pray and ask God where HE is sending you. What part of the body does He want you to be a part of? Maybe you ended up in this church but God is calling you to a different part of the body? When someone presented this question to me, I prayed and God told me He wanted me elsewhere. So I switched churches and it wasn’t necessarily a church I would have picked because it wasn’t necessarily everything I would have wanted in a church, but it was a place where I could start making connections and forming relationships and getting involved. I used to go to church and leave, without a word other than “hello” to an usher handing out programs. But now I am at a church where I have many relationships and I am stopping to greet and chat with people and it takes me half an hour or longer to get out the doors after the service is finished. Being connected makes a big difference in what you get out of church!

    And really, we need a bigger picture of what the church is. Yes, it is good to have a church to attend and get fed each Sunday, but The Church is the ENTIRE body of believers and I am always excited to have some “church time” ~ prayer nights, worship nights, etc, with a small group of close Christ friends where we seek God and ask the hard questions and challenge our thinking and pray for one another.

    I pray that God will show you what He is calling you to do about this, because I think He is pretty excited about His church (His people, His Bride!) and He wants to share His excitement with you. Catch the fire, hon! 🙂

  • […] walkingaround thoughts from Northeast « Girls Girls Girls July 12, 2013 // 0 […]

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  • July 12, 2013

    Jeff

    Sad! You sound like a hypocritical self-righteous self-centered person. Its not about you and what’s in it for you. I think you really need to learn from Jesus. Its about service and love for others.

  • July 12, 2013

    Michael A. Wyndham, Ph.D.

    Sarah,I am certain you can find lots of folk your age who, like you, know exactly what church should be. Get together with them and form something the Christian world has not yet seen: a relevant, interesting, challenging, serving, authentic, sincere gathering of humans who always and perfectly meet every need of everyone who ever comes in among them. I do not have words to express how sick I am of reading articles from dissatisfied, perfected, enlightened whiners about what the church should be and do to make them happy. My dear young friend, we were told from every quarter that the vapid sermons and silly music you now decry was the only thing we could possibly do to attract you. Now you tell us this has disappointed you. You might very well find the intimacy, relevance, depth, and integrity you desire in a small obscure church in your community but instead you flock to megachurches who are on the cutting edge of what you, and the focus groups comprised of folk like you, have told them to be and do. But now you find delight in condemning what you created by believing that the church should be shaped primarily by your ever shifting desires. Sarah, it is not the church that is the problem; it is you. I know I have written harsh things but you need to hear them. And I need to hear them. And the church needs to hear them.

  • July 17, 2013

    Ben7735

    At the Catholic mass you will find yourself in the direct presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Give it a shot sometime.

  • July 19, 2013

    Alyssa

    I understand where you are coming from. Growing up I loved Jesus with all of my heart, but when I went to church on Sundays it felt… Empty. That is the best word to describe it. I actually knew I wanted to give my life to him through ministry but not the church because I personally found him more real in other places. (That was during high school). But now (24 yrs old) I am convinced that the Church is the most beautiful thing on the planet!! I am so passionate about the Bride of Jesus! I know God has called me to see her come alive and to thrive! When I was in college, god landed me in a church that has caught vision of the heart of God! In this body, I have experienced His presence in AWESOME ways, have come to understand my identity in Christ, and have seen others come together with a purpose: love God and Love others. I believe your heart is searching for a good and right thing. his bride is beautiful and authentic. She is not created to be ordinary, dull or boring. Please don’t lose hope in the church. I use to get frustrated that she is not being who she is suppose to be.. That drove me to be angry and bitter. Please Pray for the church instead… That she would be one with Christ! John 17.

    Here is something cool our college ministry did last fall

    And this is a neat dance/spoken word from a conference we have called world mandate

    Praying that god would satisfy the deep desires of your heart and bless you with amazing believers to live life with.

  • July 20, 2013

    Cynthia

    In the Episcopal Eucharist, you also experience the real presence of Christ in the bread and the wine. The Lectionary of readings for the day have been compiled in a really thoughtful way. The preacher should be using that for fodder for the sermon, it is rich fodder. And you are right, the overwhelming call of the Bible is compassion and mercy to the poor. Jesus was quite radical, his harshest words were for the establishment for using the Law to exclude and demean people. So what does that mean for us? And in our particular communities? Is your church engaged with helping the poor? Is it inclusive like Jesus?

    Indeed, church should both inspire and challenge you. Inspire you in the liturgy, music, and words, challenge you to live into them.

    And people are right that it is also about entering into relationship. A ton of theologians have concluded that it is in community and in relationship that we work out our salvation. That takes some pro-active work. Go for it!

  • July 21, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    There is no contemporary church Jesus christ is head of.

  • July 21, 2013

    Jeff

    What do you mean, Theodore?

  • July 21, 2013

    Patrick

    We are all taught, especially those of us who are educated, that you need to rationally analyze everything that you do and every decision that you make and have all your reasons lined up as rigorously as possible, then you can feel good about it. Unfortunately, attending church and being a committed member of a church doesn’t stand up very well to that process. It often looks boring or irrelevant or any number of other unattractive things. Being an active member of a church is a commitment that does not stand or fall on reasons, kind of like marriage or loving your kids, etc. etc. You either do it or you don’t. If you do it, then you don’t look for reasons to do it, you just do it. You worship and serve God in a community. That’s all it is. Nothing more; nothing less. If that is centrally important to your life, then you don’t need reasons or even enthusiasm, you just need to keep doing it.

  • July 22, 2013

    Brother Bernard

    “I’m a college-educated young professional. I love Christ, but sometimes I feel badly because I’m not so excited about His church. I scan the congregants. As usual, mostly senior citizens and a few young families. A few sullen-looking teenagers. These people don’t know me, I think regretfully. They’ll never get me. Does God really need me here?”
    Like most people, you are alienated from your own experience. Perhaps the young families have some experience that a single lady doesn’t – but those old ladies in the pews are a gold mine. Some of them WERE young professionals in the day. All of them have been through your stage of life, and morphed, and survived. And yet, you consider them to be hopelessly irrelevant.
    You have this greatly enlarged idea of your own importance and potential. The church doesn’t seem to see it in you. It doesn’t have to. The church has ordained professionals that do everything important, and that manage the affairs of the church. The church is a business. But, the basic problem is not in the church. The basic problem is you. You refuse to admit that as far as the world goes, you ARE irrelevant. Everyone is irrelevant. If you died tomorrow of some freak accident, there would be a few ripples on the surface of your small circle of work/society, and then it would all smooth out. Your tragedy would be blocked out of the minds of her friends and relatives, and they would go on living – doing their best to forget that your fate is eventually their fate.
    And that, that is the reason that you need God. You need God because you are a frail being in a cruel, often sadistic world. In the end, your friends, your family, and her employer cannot or will not save you. Those are the facts that you are alienated from. You say that you are a “college-educated young professional”. Who gives a damn? Nobody, sweetheart. Go dig up your first grade teacher and see if she cares.
    I can speak like this to old, sick people; people who are on the other end of life. They know that they are frail. They suffer at the hands of orderlies and doctors who are patronizing at best, and sadists at their worst. “I scan the congregants. As usual, mostly senior citizens and a few young families. A few sullen-looking teenagers.” Want to know why the teenagers are “sullen-looking”? Conventional wisdom is that they don’t want to be in church with their parents on a Sunday morning. Probably true. But a lot of teenagers are “sullen-looking” because they are on the receiving end of abuse in a warped, teenaged society. Everyone lies to them. Their teachers tell 35 of them at a time that they are important. That is a lie. Their parents, if they have more than one, are never home – and when their parents finally get home, they are tired. Some of them wish that they had never had kids in the first place. Unless the kid is knockout beautiful or rich, they don’t really get much stroke from their peers. So, they drown themselves in activity, or gangs, or drugs – anything to keep the idea that they are irrelevant (or worse) at bay.
    If a church worker talked like this to the church youth, they would be promptly banned for life from doing so again. The church is heavily into the fantasy that this world can work. There’s the liberal social activism club. Then, there’s the “wealth doctrines” club. When all else fails, take the kids on a church trip to the amusement park. That’s what the parents want. Don’t tell some kid that they are frail and irrelevant and destined to die. After all, we need for them to be excited about life. They need to be inspired about the material world, so that they will work their asses off at school, and college.. and get good jobs, and get out of their parents’ houses, and never come back unless they are invited. You know… successful kids.
    Oh, but aren’t you one of those young “millennial” success stories? Why are you not happy? You say that you are looking for “hard and frank questions (to be) answered with equal hardness and frankness”. Really? After all of these years of being coddled by educational psychologists, and Kumbaya, and secular politicians? You say that one of the reasons that you have no enthusiasm for church is, “Because my parents were not enthusiastic about the church”. I mean, you’re a “young professional”, and you still blame your parents?

    Spend the night praying, my dear. Tell God your deepest fears; the ones that you don’t like to even admit to yourself. Then, go and befriend one of those old widow women in the pews. She won’t lie to you; she doesn’t have to. And, like you – she needs the company.

  • July 24, 2013

    kiwianglo

    One wonders whether the worship in the service this young woman attended included the Sacrament of the Holy Communion – in a way that demonstrated the centrality of God-in-Christ – ordained by jesus to form us into hisd redemptive Body at work in the world. In this way, our attention may be deflected from our own needs, into considering the needs of people other than ourselves. Such centredness upon God rather than ourselves can vitally transform our participation in public worship – in ways that are attractive and good, rather than critical and self-serving. The odd thing is, that such worship can be uplifiting and helpful.- to both us and the others present.

  • […] Half-time Huddle: Why I Lack Enthusiasm for the Church […]

  • July 27, 2013

    Daniel Sandoval

    May I suggest that you go back and read her post a little more carefully. Thank you.

  • July 27, 2013

    Daniel Sandoval

    May I suggest that you go back and re-read her post a little more carefully. Thank you.

  • July 31, 2013

    DME

    If the Church needs focus groups to “attract” people of a certain demographic, the problem is that the Church is running like a marketing agency and not like the Holy place of worship it should be.

    Additionally, if what you got out of these focus groups was to play stupid music, you either chose to ignore the bigger issues those in my age group are concerned with, or you didn’t bother asking people who would bring serious issues to the table.

    A Church is not a building; it is a body of believers. Perhaps if believers would try stepping outside of the four walls that have been created for them, they could understand the need in this world and actually have an opportunity to BE Christlike, and not just claim to be Christlike.

  • July 31, 2013

    DME

    I cannot even understand from this rant what you are advocating – do you want young adults to be living at home off of their parents? Are you angry that the Church doesn’t applaud intellectualism but instead would encourage play time at an amusement park? (Or are you blaming parents for that?) Is this a call to spend more time with the elderly?

    Also, I am really going to recommend you read your Bible – it worries me that you called the Church “a business”. Jesus made it implicitly clear that the Church is not to be used as a business: “Take these things away; you shall not make my Father’s house a house of trade.” John 2:16

  • August 19, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    The entry way into the church Jesus is head of is not taught by any of the contemporary churches.

  • August 19, 2013

    Jeff

    Could you explain more fully? What is the entry way into the church Jesus is head of? And, what do contemporary churches teach that it is?

  • August 19, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    Doesn’t the Lord say that there are very few that ever find the gate into his church? But the contrast is a church of some sort on the corner of every block and several more in between those. No matter which one you pick to your satisfaction all of these contemporary churches say that the crucifixion of Jesus is a direct benefit. “Died in your place”, “substituted in your place” “satisfied the requirements of the law for you”, etc. But the crucifixion of Jesus was the sin of murder wasn’t it and didn’t he say in Jn.16:8, prior to his crucifixion, that the world remains guilty of at least one sin after he was crucified? Currently it is my conviction that the numerical value of “few find it” is closer to holding up five fingers and begin subtracting to comprehend the contrast.
    Is this enough info?

  • August 19, 2013

    Erica

    I love how frank you are in this post. I am currently a junior in college and I am struggling with finding a place in the Church. Personally, I find my enthusiasm comes from the community and worship that can be found in the Church. I think that finding the right church is hard and I’m still looking for one, but I have confidence that searching will lead me too a better understanding of what I need in Christ. Don’t give up on being excited about Church, keep searching for what gives your heart delight on Sunday morning.

  • August 19, 2013

    Jeff

    So, what is the entry way into the church that Jesus is head of? You didn’t specify. Are you a part of that church?

  • August 19, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    The only Way into His church is the faith of confessing to God that you are truly sorry Jesus lost his life when he was crucified and be baptised into that confession. For it is only guilt in regard to the sin of his murder that can circumcise the human heart. What is the sin that those who were added to his church repented of after hearing the message? The sin of crucifying him. And something you might note is that a person can and does become guilty of the Lord’s body and blood by participating in the Lord’s table. For God promised him “Sit! Until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet.” and has prepared a table before him in the presence of his enemies. Yes I am a member of his church. Wanna join? There is no other Way than what I’ve told you.
    “And for Your lifeblood I will surely demand an accounting. I will demand an accounting from every animal. And from each man, too, I will demand an accounting for the life of his fellow man.” Gen. 9:5

  • August 20, 2013

    Jeff

    Sorry Theodore, No, I’m not interested in joining your church. It seems quite sectarian and contrary to the very person and nature of Jesus. According to you, “he only Way into His church is the faith of confessing to God that you are truly sorry Jesus lost his life when he was crucified and be baptised into that confession.”
    First, there is no example in the New Testament of anyone doing exactly that. No one is described as “being baptized into any confession. They are said to be baptized into Christ, into the name of Jesus, in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, etc.
    Second, there are numerous example of individuals in scripture finding forgiveness and salvation with no mention and implication whatsoever of their being sorry Jesus lost his life.
    You, like so many others, only seem to desire to set themselves up as the elite arbiters of salvation looking with disdain on those who don’t do it just right.
    Pharisee!

  • August 20, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    Have you read?
    “For it is not those who hear the law who are righteous in God’s sight, but it is those who obey the law who will be declared righteous.” Rom. 2:13
    Have you read?
    “For when there is a change of the priesthood, there must also be a change of the law.” Heb. 7:12

    Now.Just what do you mean by your ambiguous defense “contrary to the nature and person of Jesus”?

  • August 20, 2013

    Jeff

    Not interested in debating any longer with you. Bye

  • August 20, 2013

    Theodore A. Jones

    Other than a slight ambiguous retort, which was not unexpected, I think accusing yourself of debating is a fallacy. The designated practice of always be ready to give your answer has escaped your notice, evidently.

  • August 20, 2013

    Jeff

    Bye, bye, Ted.

  • […] [1] Sarah Greek, “Why I Lack Enthusiasm for the Church,” http://humanepursuits.com/2013/06/18/half-time-huddle-why-i-lack-enthusiasm-for-the-church/ […]

  • April 24, 2014

    DJK

    I certainly spent many years complaining that the church wasn’t what I wanted it to be. I still do that from time to time. The turning point came when I was challenged to stop complaining and take some initiative to meet the needs I felt were going unmet. The church isn’t first and foremost about meeting your needs, its about you being a part of Christ’s body. It’s non-negotiable.

    To be frank I found your post self-indulgent and immature. I’ve been there, and I’m too often in that place. There’s some chance that you’re in the wrong church but judging from your writing I think its certain that you need to seek a new attitude towards the admittedly messy reality of Christians living together.